Research

Examining the Long-Term Effects of Early Adolescent Meth and/or Nicotine Exposure on Behavior, Cognition, Corticosterone, and the Dopamine Transporter System in the Brain.

Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive and powerful psychomotor stimulant that affects the central nervous system. Many adolescents who use meth also smoke cigarettes.

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Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Early Adolescent Methamphetamine Exposure on Behavior and Cognition in Mice

Relatively little research has been done to examine the effects of methamphetamine (meth) during early adolescence. Based on data in human meth users and previous data from Dr. Siegel’s lab, it was hypothesized that meth exposure during early adolescence would increase aggression, depression-like behavior, and anxiety-like behaviors, and impair cognition immediately after exposure and later in adolescence.

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The Effects of Adolescent Methamphetamine Exposure on Depression-Like Behavior and the Hypothalamic Vasopressin System in Late Adolescent and Adult Mice

Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive and powerful psychomotor stimulant that affects the central nervous system by increasing synaptic levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. Meth is known to have neurotoxic effects in the adult brain that can lead to behavioral and cognitive deficits. However, little research has examined the effects of meth on the adolescent brain, which is concerning as the use of meth among adolescents is increasing. Thus we were interested in examining the long-term effects of early adolescent meth use on behavior, cognition, and the vasopressin system in the hypothalamus, which is associated with the stress response.

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